BatHat Returns!

In fact, BatHat Done!

In my defense re: yesterday’s snafu (besides viral/sinus infection brain), what I do retain from junior high sewing is strong memories of sewing with right sides together (so wrong sides facing towards you as you sew).  Then you turn it inside out and ta-da!  Not so with the last part of handsewing the lining; it’s kind of like a hem, but not quite.  And I never lined anything in junior high school.  So it didn’t seem weird to me to see the seam allowance of the lining facing me as I was sewing, especially because I wasn’t seeing the hat itself for perspective, just the half a millimeter’s worth of the knitted edge of the hat to which I was sewing the lining.

Until I turned the hat right side out, and the lining was still firmly outside in.

So, muttering, I stayed up late last night and finished the lining properly this time.  Not because the Gothlet needed to wear it; we’re having unseasonably warm (or as the Wisconsin Public Radio announcer said in a slip of the tongue this morning, ‘unreasonably warm’) temperatures today.  But purely because I was determined.  And ticked off (at myself).

So, a quick snapshot this morning; though the Gothlet likes the hat, she does not like morning, hence the face.  (In the morning, she has two speeds; molasses-in-January and glacial.)

Here’s a better Gothlet, not so good a hat picture, but no natural light now that it’s dark out early.

Plus she has an uncanny instinct for putting the color jog (which is where the seam for the lining is too) to the front where it shows up in the picture.  Sigh.  The difficult life of a knitted FO stylist.

So:

Official BatHat Notes:

Pattern: Monica Gausen’s BatHat (originally written to fit a 9-10 year-old at gauge 26 stitches/4 inches (20cm))

Yarn:  Dalegarn Falk, 1 skein black, 1 skein Neon Yellow (color now discontinued), both purchased at The Sow’s Ear, Verona, Wisconsin.  This used practically all the yellow, about 75% of the black (with mods below).

Gauge: 24 stitches/4 inches (20cm), as mentioned previously, to make this an adult-sized hat (which is why I picked this yarn as well, besides the availability of the eye-searing color requested by the Gothlet).

Modifications:  In addition to the gauge change; to make the hat slightly taller and to separate the bat motifs visually, I placed an extra row of plain knitting in the background color between bat motifs (where there is only one row in the chart, generally speaking, I put two).  Also, I rounded the top a little more by decreasing every other row instead of every row eight times, then changed to every row at the end.  The hat just didn’t look the right shape to me when I got to that point, and perhaps it was my row gauge at fault, but I didn’t want it to be too shallow; taller was okay, but a hat that doesn’t cover your ears in a Wisconsin winter is worthless.  And miserable.  And she would outgrow it promptly.  So, as you can see, it’s plenty tall for her now!  (It fits me fine.)

Other random knitting notes: I wish I could have blocked it better but was afraid of making it bigger (I tried to shrink it a bit in the dryer — it’s superwash — and didn’t want to take the dryer effect away).  Normally I wet-block hats over a blown-up balloon.  I steam-blocked this on the mannequin head you saw yesterday to tame the edging a bit (it tends to flip up, though sewing it to the lining helped) and to smooth it out a little.  Given the final size, I could probably have gone down a needle size, though that would have made my sore thumb yell (it complained in the first week anyway, but seems to be doing better now).  But the knitted fabric is nice, not too loose, not too dense.  I left floats uber-long, because I knew they’d be hidden inside a lining, and I was a little worried about twisting black yarn behind the light background color to carry them and having it show.  As it is, they don’t show at all.   There are some VERY long carries of the contrast color in the pattern, as you can see.  The fleece lining does its job, and the hat is soft and snug on her head (but I can wear it comfortably too).

Thanks to both Lisa and Sarah-Hope who brought this pattern to my attention initially. The Power of the Internet!

Speaking of the Power of the Internet:  if you were very alert, you may have noticed NaBloPoMo as a category listing at the bottom of the prior two posts.  (Or not.)  Yes, I’m planning to post daily this month, for my own amusement and challenge, and in solidarity and friendship with some of my favorite bloggers.  Last year, I knew I couldn’t since I was going to be gone without computer access (and free WordPress does not currently have a post-ahead option, though that is planned for the future).  But this year, though I will probably be gone overnight at least once, that should not be an impediment.  The biggest challenge about November is that I don’t have current pretty garden pictures to share; it’s not the most photogenic month, may I say, as I pointed out last year in birthday whining discussions.  I promise to do my best to rise to the challenge, however!  There is beauty all around if we only have the eyes to see:  for example, here are a couple pictures from this morning, as the fog was lifting on my way to work.

the-trees-cup-the-sunrise

5 responses to “BatHat Returns!

  1. Great job, Mom! Gothlet must be pleased.

  2. Very groovy hat!

    FYI… I use free wordpress, and I can set my posts to publish at a future date/time… What’s with that?

  3. I am totally loving the bathat!!!

  4. Great to see it finished! And on a such a cute girl too!🙂

  5. Pingback: Tankar ved eit tastatur » Bathat in Wisconsin!

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